Busy, Busy, Busy

Date May 16, 2013

I might not notice it at the time, but I can always tell how busy I am by how many blog posts I manage to get live. By my count, I've been doing about one every eight days so far this month (if you count this one). So I'm behind :-) So what's been going on?

LOPSA-East

But I've been doing good, fun things. For instance, on May 3rd and 4th, I went to LOPSA-East, which was yet another really great conference. There was somewhere around 150 attendees this year, and it was really nice to see everyone again from previous years.

Way back in October of 2011 (were some of you even born then?), I asked about a class on SSDs, to see if there was any interest. Well, in October of 2011, the earliest I could have done it was spring of 2012, and didn't get around to finishing the course before then, so spring of 2013 it was, and I taught the SSD class on Saturday afternoon. Only three years in the making. That's cool, right? :-D

If you were in my class, you probably have the slides from the USB key. If you weren't in my class, then you'll be happy to know that since I don't really intend to teach the class again (although if my feedback is overwhelmingly positive, I'll consider it), I opted to have it recorded, and whenever that goes live, I'll be linking to it from here and including my full slide deck, too.

Storage Field Day

At the end of April, I went to Denver to do Storage Field Day. I haven't had a chance to write about the things I saw yet, but I'm very excited to talk about what we saw with Pernix Data. If you want to see some cool ideas, watch the videos there. I'll write more as soon as I get time.

LOPSA stuff

We're still in the swing of the election season. You might have seen when I updated my earlier post that the LOPSA Live transcript had been posted. That was the first of two candidate sessions. The other is tonight at 9pm, so follow the instructions by Aaron Sachs for connecting to #LOPSA-Live on Freenode and come ask the candidates good, hard questions.

The election is coming up next month. I've posted my series of discussions on internal concerns (including membership numbers, member communications, and operational transparency. Starting tomorrow, I'm going to start posting discussions related to external concerns - we have a lot of problems with marketing and how we're seen externally...when we're seen at all. Make sure to watch for those blog entries, too.

LISA Training

I haven't posted anything about it here, but I'm working with Dan Klein to help get training ideas for LISA'13. For the past several years, I've been involved as a blogger at the LISA conference (along with Ben Cotton, Marius Ducea, Greg Riedesel, and many others. I'm planning on continuing that for as long as they'll have me, but it's also nice to be able to contribute to the program in some small way, too. This means that if there's training that you think LISA should have, but doesn't, let me know and I'll do my best to figure out how we can have it.

Actual, "I get paid to do this" work stuff

At work, we've been doing all kinds of things. I've now got a production vSphere cluster, a new Nimble storage box, I'm trying desperately to get new gear for my core switch (I'm going with a pair of Nexus 5548s and six FEX to go along), and I need to order more five or six server racks to replace some of the ones we have now.

I continue to be mystified by the way that academia works. Specifically, budgeting and deadlines. For reasons that I'm unable to fathom, in order to get things on this year's budget, I have to order hardware and have it delivered and in my space by the end of June. Not, "ordered and paid for". Ordered, delivered, and in my space. I've thought about it, and I can't come up with any kind of compelling reason for this rule. Anyone with more experience in academia than I have want to weigh in? I'm at a loss.

Personal Stuff

I've finally bit the bullet and decided to get LASIK.

I'm in a large-ish metro area now, and the technology has been continually developing for a couple of decades, and I think it's matured to the point where I'm cool with people cutting my eye open and burning part of it away using lasers. I can't be 100% about technology enhancing our lives unless I walk the walk and take advantage of it, so I'm doing it.

I went in last week for my "free consultation", which determined that I was an excellent fit for normal "LASIK" surgery. If my cornea had been too thin, I guess I could have gotten either LASEK or PRK, both of which work well but have a longer healing and recovery time. Turns out my cornea is just fine.

Also, can I just say - they have the coolest eye equipment I've ever seen there. I've worn glasses or contacts since elementary school, and I've lived in a dozen cities or so since then, so I've seen my share of optometry equipment, but man, the toys the LASIK guys have are nuts. I'm practically blind, so when they said, "take off your glasses and look in this machine, and you'll see a hot-air balloon", I thought, "please, I'll be lucky to see a blurry light". Sure enough, looking into the machine, it was blurry...for a second. Then, like a camera, it "autofocused" and just like that, they had nearly my exact prescription. Awesome!

So the whole "lasering my eyeballs" thing is happening tomorrow afternoon. I honestly can't wait. I've been thinking about it for years, and having it this close is really exciting. I'll make sure to update early next week with the results.

So there you go. That's what I've been up to. I'll try to get back to posting more regularly, and maybe even on topics that you care about! Wouldn't that be exciting? ;-)

We'll see. Thanks!

  • nomad

    I continue to be mystified by the way that academia works. Specifically, budgeting and deadlines. For reasons that I'm unable to fathom, in order to get things on this year's budget, I have to order hardware and have it delivered and in my space by the end of June. Not, "ordered and paid for". Ordered, delivered, and in my space. I've thought about it, and I can't come up with any kind of compelling reason for this rule. Anyone with more experience in academia than I have want to weigh in? I'm at a loss.

    Fraud prevention. It's a way of making sure the product is actually 1) for the project (grant) that paid for it and 2) going to the place they were told it was going.

    It's one of the many rules that was set to stop someone from doing something they were doing but weren't supposed to be doing.