Adam Moskowitz's video: The Future of System Administration

Date August 6, 2014

My friend Adam Moskowitz presented a topic at LOPSA-East this past year that is one near and dear to my heart - the Future of System Administration.

I've written a blog entry with something very close to that title twice:

A while back, I started to realize something...and I haven't written about this before, but I'm firmly coming to see that a system administrator is not just something someone is, system administration is something someone does. Regardless of whether someone's title is SysAdmin, IT Operations, Systems Engineering, or Sparkly DevOps Prince(ess), you might not be a system administrator, but you are doing systems administration.

And in the future, a lot of the people who are going to be doing systems administration are developers.

<voice="Levar Burton">But you don't have to take my word for it...</voice>

The Future of System Administration from Adam Moskowitz on Vimeo.

  • http://infrastructurewarfare.com CageGuy

    Great post, love the video! I've seen this trend coming for quite a while. As a fellow standalone sysadmin, I've had to constantly learn from a variety of different sources to succeed. One of those is automation development for the infrastructure lifecycle. Along the way I've noticed a vast amount of improvement in the ease of use in the applications available in the market. I've felt for a long while that as we move away from silos into a higher level of cloud virtualized resource pools with agile orchestration, system admins will be forced to return to being jack-of-all trades for overseeing hardware or expert developers of heterogeneous applications or openstack solutions.

    We are going into a strange world of GUI, based on ease of use and the general dislike in corporate culture for the power of IT departments. If orchestration really starts to work well, system administration jobs will become scarce and less respected. The only higher level system administration work will be in the development of the orchestration systems.

    The CLI is dead. Long live the CLI!